November 5, 2014


Democrats buck the statewide trend in Hyde County


By IRENE NOLAN


As opposed to Dare County and many other locations in the state, Democratic candidates in the 2014 mid-term general election did quite well in Hyde County.

The only Republican who won the voters' approval at the top of the ballot was incumbent U.S. Rep. Walter Jones, who was running for his 11th term from the Third Congressional District. Jones beat Democrat Marshall Adame by a margin of 70-30 percent.

Incumbent Democratic U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan won 49.9 percent of the vote in the county to Republican Thom Tillis' 44.6 percent.  Tillis won statewide with 49 percent of the vote to Hagan's 47.

In Hyde county, in the race for N.C. State Senate, District 1, Democrat Stan White of Nags Head beat incumbent Republican Bill Cook of Chocowinity by a margin of 62 percent to Cook's 38 percent.  Cook won in the district with 53 percent of the vote.

Democratic incumbent N.C. Rep. Paul Tine handily won over Republican challenger Mattie Lawson in Hyde County with 64 percent of the vote.  Tine, who was one of only two Democrats who won in Dare County, won House District 6 with 54 percent of the vote.

In the only contested local race in Hyde County, the race for Sheriff, Democrat Carl (Guire) Cahoon beat unaffiliated challenger Larry D. Weston with 80 percent of the vote.

Also elected in uncontested races were:

Democrat Seth Edwards for District Attorney.

Democrat Barry Swindell for Commissioner from Currituck Township.

Democrat Dick Tunnell for Commissioner from Swan Quarter Township.

Republican Benjamin Simmons III for Commissioner from Fairfield Township.

Democrat Brandy C. Pugh for Clerk of Superior Court.

Democrat Merita Lewis Spencer for Register of Deeds.

Voters in Hyde County also approved an amendment to the North Carolina constitution that allows a criminal defendant not facing a death sentence the option of waiving a jury trial. However, they approved it by a much narrow margin than did voters in Dare County or statewide.

The amendment – the last item on the ballot --  would require defendants in Superior Court  who choose the option to state in writing or on the record in court that their right to a trial is waived. The action must also have the consent of the trial judge. 

In Hyde County, the amendment passed with only 51 percent of the vote, as opposed to 61 percent in Dare and 53 percent statewide. 

In Hyde County, 1,824 votes were cast for a turnout among the 3,490 registered voters of 52 percent.

Click here for complete election results and judicial election results in Hyde County.

Voters in Dare County and statewide also approved an amendment to the North Carolina constitution that allows a criminal defendant not facing a death sentence the option of waiving a jury trial. The amendment – the last item on the ballot --  would require defendants in Superior Court  who choose the option to state in writing or on the record in court that their right to a trial is waived. The action must also have the consent of the trial judge.

In Dare County, the amendment passed with 61 percent of the vote.  Statewide, voters approved it by a vote of 53 percent for and 47 percent against.



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