Community News


Commentary & Guest Columns 
 

Guest Column: Shrimping is another fishery being taken hostage

A woman who has been the daughter of a commercial fisherman, granddaughter of a fish dealer, wife to a fisherman, employee in the Marine Fisheries Commission office and commercial fisheries advocate writes that she can understand why folks on all sides of fishing issues are frustrated. The Fisheries Reform Act was intended to make fisheries management effective, predictable and fair. Instead, it got bogged down in bureaucracy and politics. That’s when stakeholders began looking for shortcuts.   Read more




Commentary: McCrory set stage for latest threat to shrimping

The North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission appears poised to pass a new regulation that many critics say will drastically impact, perhaps even shut down, North Carolina’s shrimping industry.
On Jan. 17, the Marine Fisheries Commission will be holding a hearing in New Bern on the rule, which would essentially make all inland waterways a “secondary nursery” for fin fish, significantly curtailing the use of trawl nets to harvest shrimp.

After a huge turnout at a public hearing in 2013, the MFC denied a petition from an individual angler to implement similar rules.

But with anti-shrimping forces possessing what appears to be a super-majority on the MFC, the petition and hearings are back, this time proposed by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation, a group closely allied with the Coastal Conservation Association — a special interest group that has long sought to ban shrimp trawls and finfish netting from the state’s inland waters.

Read the commentary by Russ Lay in The Outer Banks Voice.


Guest Column:  The lucky little kitten

My name is Ramps, and I was born on the Outer Banks in Avon in late August of 2016. This is my sad true story about the beginning of my life.

I'm a kitten with a home now and very happy. I learned today something is going to happen next month I might not like but has to be done. 
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Guest Column: In defense of repurposing hurricane debris

A native Hatteras islander whose home was flooded by Hurricane Matthew has a different view of those who would like to take home other people's belongings from their debris piles.  There is a place, she says, in this world and in this island for repurposing. 
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An Essay on Change and Progress

Dewey Parr of Buxton, who owned the Old Gray House with his wife, Mary,  reflects on change and progress on Hatteras Island in this essay that was first published in 1996. 
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A Postscript to the Essay on Change and Progress


Dewey Parr of Buxton owned The Old Gray House in Buxton with his wife Mary for 25  years before they closed the store on Sept. 30.  In this article, he updates the essay he first wrote on change and progress on Hatteras Island 20 years ago and reflects on the changes he has seen in the past two decades. 
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